Econ. Environ. Geol. 2005; 38(5): 525-534

Published online October 31, 2005

© THE KOREAN SOCIETY OF ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY

Arsenic Adsorption onto Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell Surface

Jong-Un Lee* and Hyun-Sung Park

Microbial Geochemistry Lab. (MIGEL), Department of Geosystem Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Korea

Correspondence to :

Jong-Un Lee

jongun@chonnam.ac.kr

Received: August 9, 2005; Accepted: September 5, 2005

Abstract

Adsorption experiments for As(V) and As(III) onto the surfaces of aerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can be readily isolated from natural media, were conducted under nutrient-absent conditions. While a small amount of As(III) was adsorbed on the bacterial cell surfaces, As(V) was not effectively removed from the solution through adsorption. The result was likely due to the electrostatic repulsion between anionic compounds of aqueous As(V) and cell surfaces of P. aeruginosa. However, the bacteria forming biofilm reduced a large amount of aqueous As(V) to As(III), which indicated that microorganisms in most oligotrophic, natural geologic settings can mediate the
behavior of aqueous As. Biobarriers designed to remove the various heavy metals in contaminant plume may practically lead to the enhancement of toxicity and mobility of As.

Keywords arsenic, adsorption, bacteria, biobarrier

Article

Econ. Environ. Geol. 2005; 38(5): 525-534

Published online October 31, 2005

Copyright © THE KOREAN SOCIETY OF ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY.

Arsenic Adsorption onto Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell Surface

Jong-Un Lee* and Hyun-Sung Park

Microbial Geochemistry Lab. (MIGEL), Department of Geosystem Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Korea

Correspondence to:

Jong-Un Lee

jongun@chonnam.ac.kr

Received: August 9, 2005; Accepted: September 5, 2005

Abstract

Adsorption experiments for As(V) and As(III) onto the surfaces of aerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can be readily isolated from natural media, were conducted under nutrient-absent conditions. While a small amount of As(III) was adsorbed on the bacterial cell surfaces, As(V) was not effectively removed from the solution through adsorption. The result was likely due to the electrostatic repulsion between anionic compounds of aqueous As(V) and cell surfaces of P. aeruginosa. However, the bacteria forming biofilm reduced a large amount of aqueous As(V) to As(III), which indicated that microorganisms in most oligotrophic, natural geologic settings can mediate the
behavior of aqueous As. Biobarriers designed to remove the various heavy metals in contaminant plume may practically lead to the enhancement of toxicity and mobility of As.

Keywords arsenic, adsorption, bacteria, biobarrier

    KSEEG
    Apr 30, 2024 Vol.57 No.2, pp. 107~280

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