Econ. Environ. Geol. 2009; 42(5): 413-426

Published online October 31, 2009

© THE KOREAN SOCIETY OF ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY

Geomicrobiological Behavior of Heavy Metals in Paddy Soil Near Abandoned Au-Ag Mine Supplied with Carbon Sources

M.-S. Ko1, J.-U. Lee2*, H.-S. Park3, J.-S. Shin4, K.-M. Bang4, H.-T. Chon5, J.-S. Lee3 and J.-Y. Kim1

1Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST)
2Department of Energy and Resources Engineering, Chonnam National University
3Technology Research Center, Mine Reclamation Corporation
4Daewoo Engineering
5Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Seoul National University

Correspondence to :

J.-U. Lee

jongun@chonnam.ac.kr

Received: September 4, 2009; Accepted: October 5, 2009

Abstract

The study was conducted to investigate the effects of indigenous bacteria on geochemical behavior of toxic heavy metals in contaminated paddy soil near an abandoned mine. The effects of sulfate amendment to stimulate microbial sulfate reduction on heavy metal behaviors were also investigated. Batch-type experiments were performed with lactate or glucose as a carbon source to activate indigenous bacteria in the soil under anaerobic condition for 100days. Sulfate (250 mg/L) was artificially injected at 60 days after the onset of the experiments. In the case of glucose supply, solution pH increased from 4.8 to 7.6 while pH was maintained at 7~8 in the lactate solution. The initial low pH in the case of glucose supply likely resulted in the enhanced extraction of Fe and most heavy metals at the initial experimental period. Lactate supply exerted no significant difference on the amounts of dissolved Zn, Pb, Ni and Cu between microbial and abiotic control slurries; however, lower Zn, Pb and Ni and higher Cu concentrations were observed in the microbial slurries than in the controls when glucose supplied. Sulfate amendment led to dramatic decrease in dissolved Cr and maintenance of dissolved As, both of which had gradually increased over time till the sulfate injection. Black precipitates formed in solution after sulfate amendment, and violarite(Fe+2Ni+32S4) was found with XRD analysis in the microbial precipitates. Conceivably the mineral might be formed after Fe(III)
reduction and microbial sulfate reduction with coprecipitation of heavy metal. The results suggested that heavy metals which can be readily extracted from contaminated paddy soils may be stabilized in soil formation by microbial sulfate reduction.

Keywords paddy soil, arsenic, heavy metals, bacteria, sulfate reduction

Article

Econ. Environ. Geol. 2009; 42(5): 413-426

Published online October 31, 2009

Copyright © THE KOREAN SOCIETY OF ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY.

Geomicrobiological Behavior of Heavy Metals in Paddy Soil Near Abandoned Au-Ag Mine Supplied with Carbon Sources

M.-S. Ko1, J.-U. Lee2*, H.-S. Park3, J.-S. Shin4, K.-M. Bang4, H.-T. Chon5, J.-S. Lee3 and J.-Y. Kim1

1Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST)
2Department of Energy and Resources Engineering, Chonnam National University
3Technology Research Center, Mine Reclamation Corporation
4Daewoo Engineering
5Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Seoul National University

Correspondence to:

J.-U. Lee

jongun@chonnam.ac.kr

Received: September 4, 2009; Accepted: October 5, 2009

Abstract

The study was conducted to investigate the effects of indigenous bacteria on geochemical behavior of toxic heavy metals in contaminated paddy soil near an abandoned mine. The effects of sulfate amendment to stimulate microbial sulfate reduction on heavy metal behaviors were also investigated. Batch-type experiments were performed with lactate or glucose as a carbon source to activate indigenous bacteria in the soil under anaerobic condition for 100days. Sulfate (250 mg/L) was artificially injected at 60 days after the onset of the experiments. In the case of glucose supply, solution pH increased from 4.8 to 7.6 while pH was maintained at 7~8 in the lactate solution. The initial low pH in the case of glucose supply likely resulted in the enhanced extraction of Fe and most heavy metals at the initial experimental period. Lactate supply exerted no significant difference on the amounts of dissolved Zn, Pb, Ni and Cu between microbial and abiotic control slurries; however, lower Zn, Pb and Ni and higher Cu concentrations were observed in the microbial slurries than in the controls when glucose supplied. Sulfate amendment led to dramatic decrease in dissolved Cr and maintenance of dissolved As, both of which had gradually increased over time till the sulfate injection. Black precipitates formed in solution after sulfate amendment, and violarite(Fe+2Ni+32S4) was found with XRD analysis in the microbial precipitates. Conceivably the mineral might be formed after Fe(III)
reduction and microbial sulfate reduction with coprecipitation of heavy metal. The results suggested that heavy metals which can be readily extracted from contaminated paddy soils may be stabilized in soil formation by microbial sulfate reduction.

Keywords paddy soil, arsenic, heavy metals, bacteria, sulfate reduction

    KSEEG
    Apr 30, 2024 Vol.57 No.2, pp. 107~280

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