reaction path modeling" /> Maeng-Eon Park" /> Maeng-Eon Park, Kyu-Youl Sung and Yong-Kwon Koh

" /> Maeng-Eon Park, Kyu-Youl Sung and Yong-Kwon Koh

. Econ. Environ. Geol. 2000;33:405-15. https://doi.org/">

Econ. Environ. Geol. 2000; 33(5): 405-415

Published online October 31, 2000

© THE KOREAN SOCIETY OF ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY

Formation of Acid Mine Drainage and Pollution of Geological Environment Accompanying the sulfidation Zone of Nonmetallic Deposits: Reaction Path Modeling on the Formation of AMD of Tongnae Pyrophyllite Mine

Maeng-Eon Park*, Kyu-Youl Sung* and Yong-Kwon Koh**

*Department of Environmental Geosciences, Pukyung National University, Pusan 608-737, Korea

**Korea Atomic Energy Research Insti- tute, Taejon 306-606, Korea

Correspondence to :

Maeng-Eon Park

mepark@pknu.ac.kr

Received: August 23, 2000; Accepted: September 29, 2000

Abstract

<p class="바탕글">This study was carried out to understand the formation of acid mine drainage (AMD) by pyrophyllite (so-called Napseok)-rainwater interaction (weathering), dispersion patterns of heavy metals, and patterns of mixing with non-polluted water in the Tongnae pyrophyllite mine. Based on the mass balance and reation path modeling, using both the geochemistry of water and occurrence of the secondary minerals (weathering products), the geochemical evolution of AMD was simulated by computer code of SOLVEQ and CHILLER. It showsthat the pH of stream water is from 6.2 to 7.3 upstream of the Tongnae mine. Close to the mine, the pH decreases to 2. Despite being diluted with non-polluted tributaries, the acidity of mine drainage water maintains as far as downstream. The results of modeling of water-rock interaction show that the activity of hydrogen ion increasesn (pH decreases), the concentration of HCO3- decreases associated with increasing H+ activity, as the reaction is processing. The concentration of SO42- first increases minutely, but later increases rapidly as pH drops below 4.3. The concentrations of cations and heavy metals are controlled by the dissolution of reactants and re-dissolution of derived species (weathering products) according to the pH. The continuous adding of reactive minerals, namely the progressively larger degrees if water-rock interaction, causes the formation of secondary minerals in the following sequence; goethite, then Mn-oxides, then boehmite, then kaolinite, then Ca-nontronite, then Mg-nontronite, and finally chalcedony. The results of reaction path modeling agree well with the field data, and offer useful information on the geochemical evolution of AMD. The results of reaction path modeling on the formation of AMD offer useful information for the estimation and the appraisal of pollution caused by water-rock interaction as geological environments. And also, the ones can be used as data for the choice of appropriate remediation technique for AMD.

Keywords

reaction path modeling, acid mine drainage, pyrophyllite mine, sulfidation zone, geological pollution

Article

Econ. Environ. Geol. 2000; 33(5): 405-415

Published online October 31, 2000

Copyright © THE KOREAN SOCIETY OF ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY.

Formation of Acid Mine Drainage and Pollution of Geological Environment Accompanying the sulfidation Zone of Nonmetallic Deposits: Reaction Path Modeling on the Formation of AMD of Tongnae Pyrophyllite Mine

Maeng-Eon Park*, Kyu-Youl Sung* and Yong-Kwon Koh**

*Department of Environmental Geosciences, Pukyung National University, Pusan 608-737, Korea

**Korea Atomic Energy Research Insti- tute, Taejon 306-606, Korea

Correspondence to:

Maeng-Eon Park

mepark@pknu.ac.kr

Received: August 23, 2000; Accepted: September 29, 2000

Abstract

This study was carried out to understand the formation of acid mine drainage (AMD) by pyrophyllite (so-called Napseok)-rainwater interaction (weathering), dispersion patterns of heavy metals, and patterns of mixing with non-polluted water in the Tongnae pyrophyllite mine. Based on the mass balance and reation path modeling, using both the geochemistry of water and occurrence of the secondary minerals (weathering products), the geochemical evolution of AMD was simulated by computer code of SOLVEQ and CHILLER. It showsthat the pH of stream water is from 6.2 to 7.3 upstream of the Tongnae mine. Close to the mine, the pH decreases to 2. Despite being diluted with non-polluted tributaries, the acidity of mine drainage water maintains as far as downstream. The results of modeling of water-rock interaction show that the activity of hydrogen ion increasesn (pH decreases), the concentration of HCO3- decreases associated with increasing H+ activity, as the reaction is processing. The concentration of SO42- first increases minutely, but later increases rapidly as pH drops below 4.3. The concentrations of cations and heavy metals are controlled by the dissolution of reactants and re-dissolution of derived species (weathering products) according to the pH. The continuous adding of reactive minerals, namely the progressively larger degrees if water-rock interaction, causes the formation of secondary minerals in the following sequence; goethite, then Mn-oxides, then boehmite, then kaolinite, then Ca-nontronite, then Mg-nontronite, and finally chalcedony. The results of reaction path modeling agree well with the field data, and offer useful information on the geochemical evolution of AMD. The results of reaction path modeling on the formation of AMD offer useful information for the estimation and the appraisal of pollution caused by water-rock interaction as geological environments. And also, the ones can be used as data for the choice of appropriate remediation technique for AMD.

Keywords

reaction path modeling, acid mine drainage, pyrophyllite mine, sulfidation zone, geological pollution

    KSEEG
    Jun 30, 2024 Vol.57 No.3, pp. 281~352

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