Econ. Environ. Geol. 2010; 43(1): 13-20

Published online February 28, 2010

© THE KOREAN SOCIETY OF ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY

Assessment of Adsorption Capacity of Mushroom Compost in AMD Treatment Systems

Bo-Young Yong1, Dong-Wan Cho2, Jin Woong Jeong3, Gil Jae Lim1, Sang Woo Ji1, Joo Sung Ahn1 and Hocheol Song1*

1Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon 305-350, Korea
2Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710, Korea
3Department of Geology and Earth Environmental Science, Choongnam University, Daejeon 305-764, Korea

Correspondence to :

Hocheol Song

hsong@kigam.re.kr

Received: December 14, 2009; Accepted: February 18, 2010

Abstract

Acid mine drainage (AMD) from abandoned mine sites typically has low pH and contains high level of various heavy metals, aggravating ground- and surface water qualities and neighboring environments. This study investigated removal of heavy metals in a biological treatment system, mainly focusing on the removal by adsorption on a substrate material. Bench-scale batch experiments were performed with a mushroom compost to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of heavy metals leached out from a mine tailing sample and the role of SRB in the overall removal process. In addition, adsorption experiments were perform using an artificial AMD sample containing
Cd2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+ to assess adsorption capacity of the mushroom compost. The results indicated Mn leached out from mine tailing was not subject to microbial stabilization or adsorption onto mushroom compost while microbially mediated stabilization played an important role in the removal of Zn. Fe leaching significantly increased in the presence of microbes as compared to autoclaved samples, and this was attributed to dissolution of Fe minerals in the mine tailing in a response to the depletion of Fe3+ by iron reduction bacteria. Measurement of oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and pH indicated the reactive mixture maintained reducing condition and moderate pH during the reaction. The results of the adsorption experiments involving artificial AMD sample indicated adsorption removal efficiency was greater than 90% at pH 6 condition, but it decreased at pH 3 condition.

Keywords acid mine drainage, adsorption, biological treatment, organic substrate, sulfate reducing bacteria

Article

Econ. Environ. Geol. 2010; 43(1): 13-20

Published online February 28, 2010

Copyright © THE KOREAN SOCIETY OF ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY.

Assessment of Adsorption Capacity of Mushroom Compost in AMD Treatment Systems

Bo-Young Yong1, Dong-Wan Cho2, Jin Woong Jeong3, Gil Jae Lim1, Sang Woo Ji1, Joo Sung Ahn1 and Hocheol Song1*

1Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon 305-350, Korea
2Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710, Korea
3Department of Geology and Earth Environmental Science, Choongnam University, Daejeon 305-764, Korea

Correspondence to:

Hocheol Song

hsong@kigam.re.kr

Received: December 14, 2009; Accepted: February 18, 2010

Abstract

Acid mine drainage (AMD) from abandoned mine sites typically has low pH and contains high level of various heavy metals, aggravating ground- and surface water qualities and neighboring environments. This study investigated removal of heavy metals in a biological treatment system, mainly focusing on the removal by adsorption on a substrate material. Bench-scale batch experiments were performed with a mushroom compost to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of heavy metals leached out from a mine tailing sample and the role of SRB in the overall removal process. In addition, adsorption experiments were perform using an artificial AMD sample containing
Cd2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+ to assess adsorption capacity of the mushroom compost. The results indicated Mn leached out from mine tailing was not subject to microbial stabilization or adsorption onto mushroom compost while microbially mediated stabilization played an important role in the removal of Zn. Fe leaching significantly increased in the presence of microbes as compared to autoclaved samples, and this was attributed to dissolution of Fe minerals in the mine tailing in a response to the depletion of Fe3+ by iron reduction bacteria. Measurement of oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and pH indicated the reactive mixture maintained reducing condition and moderate pH during the reaction. The results of the adsorption experiments involving artificial AMD sample indicated adsorption removal efficiency was greater than 90% at pH 6 condition, but it decreased at pH 3 condition.

Keywords acid mine drainage, adsorption, biological treatment, organic substrate, sulfate reducing bacteria

    KSEEG
    Jun 30, 2024 Vol.57 No.3, pp. 281~352

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